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Perks of Joining the Tiny House Movement

January 19, 2018
Perks of Joining the Tiny House Movement

Have you ever daydreamed about the simpler, more compact way of living?

Living free from rent and mortgages in a home you’ve built yourself may seem like an impossible dream, but it isn’t so. If you’re following the popular culture, you’ve probably noticed the rise of a Tiny House Movement. What they do is basically lowering their footprint on the surroundings through somewhat of an extreme downsizing.

According to the American Tiny House Association, there are tiny houses with 70 square feet. For those of you unfamiliar with the American house sizes, let’s say that an average house has around 2,600 square feet. Compared to that, you understand why we said “extreme downsizing” earlier on.

The Perks

There are a lot of things that lead people to join the Tiny House Movement. Some want to be able to simply pack up the entire house and move to a different location, others are trying to reduce their footprint on the environment, while some have simply grown tired of living in a large, expensive estate, and want to try a simpler way of life.

So, without further ado, let’s take a step back and try to understand the reasons why people are getting more involved with this idea. Here are some of the most common perks of joining the Tiny House Movement.

Environmentally friendly way of living

One of the major reasons why people decide to start their tiny house adventure is the environment. Most of the tiny houses are done in a sustainable and very energy-efficient way.

Tiny houses generally need a lot less energy consumption, as you get to regulate the temperature and the lighting extremely easy in a small space. Using solar panels is also very common with Tiny House Movement, so using solar panels to produce energy and lower the carbon footprint on our planet is something more people should be thinking about.

Generally, switching to a tiny house not only helps the environment quite significantly, but it also helps you save money. Another plus side is that you can maintain your tiny house with recycled materials, which is another great way to help both the environment and your budget in a long run.

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Mobility

Definitely one of the biggest perks of owning a tiny house is the potential ability to move it wherever and whenever you want. The popularity of tiny house which have wheels is skyrocketing, as the owners are free to move as they please, and the efficiency of the tiny house is much greater than it is with the RV, for example.

Basically, with a tiny house on wheels, you’re never tied to a single place; you can take it on vacations, big moves across the country and never think about looking for a hotel in your life again. With a fully mobile tiny house, you commonly get rain barrels and filters, solar panels and similar utilities which have a goal of keeping their owners off the grid. However, there are some locations which don’t allow tiny house owners to stay longer than a certain period of time, but there is the abundance of those locations where you can take your tiny home and stay for as long as you want.

Multi-functionality

When you decide to limit your living space to a certain square footage, you will have to find some solutions to adapt to the fact that there’s not so much free space around. This is why you need to start thinking about multi-functional solutions. Think about seating with storage space within, sliding and modular furniture, mobile lighting, folding ladders and house elements and so on. All of these things can help you maximize your living space while still living in a tiny house.

Folding chairs and drapes and curtains can really help separate the different zones within a tiny house, if necessary, while some tiny house owners go as far to get another tiny house for additional uses. Whether it’s a guest house, a home office, a studio or something completely different, with the low expenses and all the other perks of owning a tiny house, you just need a bit of imagination and some careful planning to change both your life and the way you impact your environment.

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De-cluttering your life

Once you’ve decided to switch to the tiny house from your 2000+ square foot home, there is no way you will be able to keep all the stuff you had in your 200 square feet tiny house. This is a great opportunity to de-clutter your life and get rid of all of the unnecessary things and possessions you hoarded during the years.

There are, most certainly, certain items and things you will want to keep, and there are definitely some memorabilia you wouldn’t want to get rid of, but one of the reasons why you’re considering such a move is because you need a different way of life. Donate your possessions, organize backyard sales, and find self-storage solutions like SES, but keep in mind – once you get rid of all the unnecessary possessions, you will feel relieved and ready for your tiny house lifestyle.

Final Thoughts

Whether you’re sick and tired of cleaning your large house, or you simply don’t want to spend the rest of your life paying mortgages, taxes and different utility bills, considering joining a Tiny House Movement is always a great idea. It can help you save money in both long and the short run, it can help you make a difference when it comes to our environment and it can really help you experience a completely different way of life. With a bit of researching and some planning you can become a part of a Tiny House Movement in no time, just keep it real and be determined. It will pay off in the end.


We hope you found this article helpful. Thank you to David Koller for contributing it.


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David Koller is a freelance blogger passionately interested in minor house fixes and home décor.